Moonrise Kingdom

Hello followers and sorry for neglecting this blog. I’ve been busy graduating from university – if you’d like to find out about my final year project click here.

Otherwise, welcome back to Design Inspiration. I went to see Moonrise Kingdom directed by Wes Anderson, and for the first time in non-animated film history, I felt inspired in a design way.


Image from www.booooooom.com

From the opening sequence to the credits, it’s evident that a designer’s voice was present. The children’s rooms are bigger to make them look small and almost eerily symmetrical. The aesthetic of boy-scouting is so thorough that it becomes unreal – it becomes more fantastical, more like a child’s vision interpreted by an adult. There’s even a lighthouse that looks like a child’s drawing made into reality.


Image from sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com

The aesthetic really works – making something fantastical, escaping to a parallel universe, gives us a different viewpoint to look at humanity. The characters are well-observed. They seem like characters that could exist in the real world, except that the children act like adults. Maybe that’s so that we don’t dismiss their problems. We take them seriously.


Image from theculturevulture.co.uk


Image from www.hollywood.com

While I’m not really into fantasy films, I love this kind of fantasy. It’s a more beautiful, more simple world, if only materially. It’s that, but doesn’t involve showing off the latest styles as many films do. It’s not concerned with mainstream styling. And if you were thinking of making the argument that it couldn’t show the latest styles anyway because it’s set in 1965: watch Rock of Ages. It’s set in 1987 and it’s so completely a mainstream take on the 1980s. (Incidentally it’s fun and funny, but not inspirational.)


Image from theshootening.com

Anyway, read this Time Out article for more insight into the film. Then get it on DVD. Unfortunately it’s out of the cinemas and was only in selected cinemas anyway. Can’t wait for the DVD release!

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